Blockbuster Review: Viswaroopam (Tamil Film) – Gallant Gusto!


To begin with, let’s get the dialogue right.

Q: Was it worth the hoopla?
A: No. Pertinence of few hopelessly wounded individuals lay squashed beneath.

Q: Did it have enough to be termed as the ‘Blockbuster’?
A: To a large extent, yes. Except the narration (in the second half) that could have been crispier and the climax that should have been a raunchy affair, rest was quoted brilliance.

Now, for the review that I remain famished to gorge.

It’s a brilliant film that could been better by few notches. After all the misguided propaganda that the film garnered with ease, it revelled under the apt sun. And, our undisputed and quite phenomenally, Kamal Haasan is back. His screenplay, as always, was rhetoric in content and phased narration was nicely embedded. The script is borrowed intelligently from various incident prone subjugations and has his impeccable zeal to make it real. Directed well within his vision, Viswaroopam’s decorated closet includes Rahul Bose, Jaideep Ahlawat and Shekar Kapur (a cameo though). All give commendable performances, when we account for their presence in a frame that’s smeared with the mighty Kamal Haasan. The ladies have nothing to do in this game of havoc, Andrea was probably adamant to get herself wasted. Nasser’s is a bold act and he enacts perfectly.

The introduction of the real protagonist was a stunner and I went gaga over it (everytime). And remember, only Kamal Haasan can pull it off in a fit of ruthless debonair. The first half is splendid and takes you through the vintage problems of planet earth with consummate ease. The duels in Afghanistan are a visual spectacle and you are bound to get goosebumps. As the animated choreographer, he is adorable. His encounters with Rahul Bose infringe sparks in mellowed sequences and Jaideep as his closest aid is impressive. Significantly, both have spoken and dubbed in Tamil. It looks refreshingly odd and fits the need of the bill.

The final 15-20 minutes took me by surprise, disappointingly. After a scorcher of a first half, I expected a powerhouse climax. Unfortunately, Kamal probably kept too much of it in wraps in lieu of his sequel (that’s predictably in pre production). I get the noble thrill but eluded me of my insatiable proportions. Yet, Viswaroopam held sway in an emphatic fashion.

With contemporary liaisons dominating our surrounding lives amidst a pickle-like frontier of decaying charm, Viswaroopam enthrals adequately.

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